Sunday, October 21, 2012

Results of Tomato Stake Trials!

Results of Tomato Stake Trials are In!

 I don't like tomato cages so this year I tested four different tomato stakes, from left to right they were: 
   1) Steel T-posts 2)Wooden Stakes 3)Bamboo Stakes 4)Store bought Plastic coated Stakes

 First, was the Steel T-Post. I liked them the most, they were very sturdy and didn't ever bend over, held up to strong winds and the heavy laden fruit on the plants! They do cost a little but the will last for a very long time. I am sure you could use small pipe or re-bar as well.
 Second, the old fashioned wooden stake. They were sturdy but not quit tall enough, not very costly. They only real problem I see is that you may only get 2 or 3 years out of them do to termites and rot.
 Third, was the Bamboo stakes.These were my second favorite! They were free, remember my neighbor/friend Jason? Well, he found a patch of what we call around here "River Cain", AKA "Bamboo". All we had to go do was cut it and haul it. They were tall enough because we cut them 9 to 10 feet tall, so after putting about 2 feet in the ground, they were just right. They held up to the wind and laden fruit and Bamboo doesn't rot so they should be around for awhile!
 Fourth, were the cheep plastic coated stakes. I really thought these were gonna be the best thing since sliced bread until the all powerful "Derecho Storm" hit and bent them right over to the ground and I mean to the ground! The other 3 did just fine in the storm but the plastic stakes that a buddy talked me into trying bent right over. I will just used them to stake my pepper plants next year, never tomatoes again, lol!
  I know there are other ways to stake tomatoes out there that I didn't try this year.. If you have tried something different and have had success or failure please share with us.


“For I know the thoughts that I think toward you, says the LORD, thoughts of peace and not of evil, to give you a future and a hope.” Jeremiah 29:11 


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13 comments:

  1. I'm still a tomato cage type of gal, for all four of my tomato plants!!!

    Gill

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    1. I know lots of people who use cages and have much success!

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  2. Interesting post. I've tried both cages and stakes, without much success. Next year we're putting in 3 t-posts in the tomato beds and tying cattle panels to them. I'll tie the tomatoes to that.

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    1. Let me know how that works. That might be the way to go!

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  3. I still use the cages but it is good to know what works and what does not. B

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  4. I didn't stake mine this year - probably why they didn't do all that well.

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    Replies
    1. Probably! They don't like to lay on the ground that much. I was told one time that if you don't stake them you can lay straw down for the tomatoes to sit on. I guest you could call them "Straw Tomatoes"? Never tried it though!

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  5. Thank you for sharing at the Thursday Favorite Things hop. Wishing you a happy weekend. xo

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  6. I'd like to invite you to join me at the Clever Chicks Blog Hop this week! http://www.the-chicken-chick.com/2012/11/clever-chicks-blog-hop-8-and-rural.html

    I hope to see you there!
    Cheers!
    Kathy Shea Mormino
    The Chicken Chick

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  7. Wow! there are quite a few patches of bamboo around here - quite invasive - will have to give them a try - I am not fond of the cages too - I do appreciate you sharing with Home and Garden Thursday,
    Kathy

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  8. I've grown tomotoes for a lot of years using a lot of methods. Top two: rebar (my Marzanos have grown over 7 feet high using this method) and tomato tables. Rebar staking is labor intensive as you have to stay on top of tying your main vine and pinching off the suckers. But, you get a great, healthy yield. The tomato tables were awesome, but lost some production in the center where they got less light. However, less time was required to maintain. I get a lot of high winds here in the Idaho Palouse and staking also prevents breakage which I get every time with the cages. This is a great site, I will visit again when I have more time. God bless.

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