Saturday, March 10, 2012

Heirloom vrs. Hybrid Part 2


 Part 1 was about Heirlooms, this is gonna be about Hybrids! I didn't know a great deal about the scientific part going into this research study that I have done. I have found out lots of great information and two blogs that have lots of great information on it for us all to read. The name of the blog's are  "The Garden of Eaden" and "The Green Girls". I also received lots of good information off of one of my favorite site "The Victory Garden".
 Here is what I learned in a summary and you can check out the other articles latter! A hybrid seed is one that has been created by artificially cross pollinating two or more varieties of a plant so that the resulting plants will have better disease resistance, produce more, and have a uniform color, texture, and flavor. Hybrid seeds are the first generation of seeds from the cross pollination process. You are supposed to get more "bang for your buck" with hybrid seeds. Just be sure to water, fertilize, and keep the bugs and weeds away and you should have a successful harvest. Another thing I found out is that some hybrid tomatoes are bred to be picked green and gas ripened because that is what is needed for commercial growing and shipping! Ripen-Green-Tomatoes
   I guess it would be like one of those churches that just do whatever they can to grow bigger and get more and more people in the door and in the pew at whatever cost. Sacrificing the truth and fullness of Gods Word to achieve this. The pastors of those churches get a bigger yield but their fruit (congregation) are not as flavorful and may not produce fruit like the parent plant (in must cases, not all). Hybrids become more clonish (if you will) and have less individuality, losing their own individual flavor because they didn't grow the way God intended them to, they grow how some else thought they should. Just a thought of contrast!
Would you rather it be like this?
  Pros of using hybrid seeds: Much research has gone into the production of hybrid seeds to ensure the seeds produce plants that have the best attributes of their "parent" plants. The produce you get from a hybrid seed is more attractive and uniform that the produce from an heirloom seed (just remember beauty is in the eye of the beholder). You usually get a bigger yield from a hybrid plant and the shelf life of hybrid produce is usually longer than that of it's heirloom cousin (you sacrifice a lot for that). Hybrid plants are more disease resistant than their heirloom cousins (that is yet to be proven to me).
Or this?
  Cons of using hybrid seeds: The produce from a hybrid seed may not be as flavorful as its heirloom cousin due to emphasis being placed on uniformity, production, and shelf life rather than flavor. The biggest difference though between hybrid and heirloom plants is the inability to harvest seeds from a hybrid and produce the same or similar plant next year. With hybrids the resulting seeds may be sterile or produce something totally unlike the plant it was harvested from.





  While searching around and trying to find the real meanings between theses two groups of seeds I found one more group called "organic seeds". I have found that they are a lot like the "heirloom seed group", with the exception that they have to have been grown in these conditions.  The soil grown in can not have had any non organic fertilizers or hormone additives. The plants themselves can never have had pesticides or any other non organic chemical placed on them. Basically they have to be 100% grown the way God intended them to be grown, to be certified as "organic seeds".  I wanted to share what Cristy@CraftyCristy shared with us, "I have found organic seeds that are hybrids. So organic does not equal heirloom. You have to check. Organic just talks about how it is grown. It can't be genetically modified, but it can be hybrid."  For more on "Organic" check out, AMS, USDA or CCOF.
  I hope this helped and didn't confuse you more in anyway. My example was just that, not all large churches fit that mold, I was just trying to show how things can loss their heirloom qualities or heritage if trying to be conformed to something that God never intended for the individual (veggie or person) to be. When God saved me, He didn't take the good characteristics out of me that made me Clint (and make me like a spasific group), He took my imperfections and placed on Jesus and Jesus' righteousness and place on me Check out "Can We Do Enough". God Bless each of you!



Matthew 13:22 "Now he who received seed among the thorns is he who hears the word, and the cares of this world and the deceitfulness of riches choke the word, and he becomes unfruitful. 23 But he who received seed on the good ground is he who hears the word and understands it, who indeed bears fruit and produces: some a hundredfold, some sixty, some thirty.”

13 comments:

  1. I have found organic seeds that are hybrids. So organic does not equal heirloom. You have to check. Organic just talks about how it is grown. It can't be genetically modified, but it can be hybrid. Just so you know.

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    1. Thank you Cristy, I will add that right now! Thats why I love this way of learning. Each of us sharing what we know. I find its the best way to learn.

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    2. I agree. I have learned TONS since I began to blog.

      Thanks for following my blog.

      Are you going to carry this line of thought on from here to seed purity, and how that relates to God's desire for heart purity? I would love to read that as a follow up to these two posts.

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    3. That would be an interesting thought. Thanks for the idea!

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  2. I love your comment about some churches doing anything to get followers. That is so true. I prefer a church and a pastor that tells it like it is. Whether I like what he has to say or not. Either it's Bible based or not. Case closed. If the pastor has ticked me off with what he said but it was based in the Bible then he did his job right.

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  3. I am glad you are researching and learning this information. Thank you Clint for keeping up all informed...

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  4. I'm getting ready to put some Botanical Interests Mesclun, Freckles Romaine lettuce and Lavewa Spinach in the beds we prepared. We're supposedly within the right time for the frost tables, particularly this year. We'll see. The collards are growing so these should.

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  5. When I try to grow tomatoes soon, I'm looking for heirloom varieties. I was told to buy a disease-resistant variety...but I'm thinking heirloom is the best way to go. Greetings from the ocean shores of California, Heather :)

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  6. Great write up Clint. One of my goals is to seed save everything we like to grow, but I still do plant hybrids on occasion. Sometimes it's a good way to try a new vegetable out.

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  7. Hi Clint,
    Great post. I love your super church analogy. I have been growing both hybrid and heirloom for years, though I am trying to get to heirlooms only, eventually. I know that producers claim heirloom is not as attractive, but my heirlooms look as good or better than my hybrids. I have clay soil and I have noticed that my hybrids start stronger, but my heirlooms finish stronger in my garden. The heirlooms have a more diverse genetic background, and that seems to help them adapt better to my soil and temperature deviations, as evenings get cooler. Genetic diversity is the most important piece of this puzzle for me. My professor told me a few months back that nearly 100% of hybrid tomato seeds are now manufactured in China because the labor costs are so high. One family lives on a farm with two fields. They painstakingly go through the fields removing one breed's male reproductive parts (anthers) so that there is only cross pollination from the neighboring variety. Can you imagine snipping off all the tiny anthers on teeny tiny tomato blooms? Not me.

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    1. Its sad that because of the cost of labor we send everything over seas to be done!

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